Tag Archives: quickfix

Fix PGP error NO_PUBKEY when apt-get updating

28 Oct

It is common to find that a  sudo apt-get update does not do a clean job because of a couple of missing public keys. You might get something of the type:

W: GPG error: <a href="http://ppa.launchpad.net">http://ppa.launchpad.net</a> trusty InRelease: The following signatures couldn't be verified because the public key is not available: NO_PUBKEY 8BAF9A6F

Usually, it is possible to directly fetch the missing public key from a popular key server like Ubuntu’s:

sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys PUBKEY

… where PUBKEY is replaced by the right identifier in your warning message.

That is usually enough and concludes with gpg: Total number processed: 1

However, if the key is not found on the server, you might have to look for it yourself. For example, in the case of the following error:

W: GPG error: http://download.opensuse.org  Release: The following signatures couldn't be verified because the public key is not available: NO_PUBKEY F2AA0B1E5EF8303B

… the missing key was not available on the Ubuntu key server. I had to first check what exactly the problematic source’s URL looked like, which you can do by either using your distribution’s updater’s GUI (for example, Muon Update Manager > More… > Advanced … > Configure software sources), or by finding it in /etc/apt/sources.list or /etc/apt/sources.list.d/. In my case, the URL was http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/antonbatenev:/tox/xUbuntu_14.04/, which is where I navigated to in my Internet browser to find a Release.key file.

Once you have downloaded that key, you can use the following command to add it to your keyring:

sudo apt-key add Downloads/Release.key

(Make sure you replace Downloads/Release.key with the right path/name.)

Now, you should be able to re-run sudo apt-get update and not run into any warning!

Add missing icons in Ring client

14 Sep

You might have noticed that your Ring desktop client (in my case, the ring package for an Ubuntu 14.04-based distro, version 20160908.1.07d3d92~dfsg1-1 at the time of writing, launched with the gnome-ring command) is missing some icons and shows a red “forbidden” sign instead.

Missing icons in Ring client

Missing icons in Ring client

I fixed that by simply installing a missing dependency called gnome-icon-theme-symbolic. You can do that by executing the following command in a terminal:

sudo apt-get install gnome-icon-theme-symbolic

Close and re-launch the client and the icons should be restored.

Fix two conflicting versions of Keybase

8 Sep

Not having updated keybase in a while (since 0.8.23!…), I ran into an issue after trying to get the latest version (1.0.17) as described on the website: an apt-cache policy keybase would tell me that I had the most recent version installed, whereas running keybase version would return the older one.

The problem is that keybase went from Node.js to Go, and the install method changed. The older version I had installed created a binary in usr/local/bin whereas the new version installed it in usr/bin.

You can see if that is your case by running the two following commands:

/usr/bin/keybase version
/usr/local/bin/keybase version

They should return different versions.

To fix that, you need to uninstall the older version with the following command:

sudo npm uninstall -g keybase

Then, run run_keybase and you should be good!

Fix different locales being used in terminal output on Ubuntu 14.04(-based) distros with KDE

22 Jun

I was having an issue with a number of different languages being used simultaneously, and in a seemingly random fashion, in my terminal output (and in other apps), on my KXStudio 14.04 install. I remember having played around with locales a while ago, but I could not figure out how to go back to my terminal using only one language.

After searching for a bit, and figuring that /etc/default/locale wasn’t the source of the issue, I found that I had to edit ~/.KDE/env/setlocale.sh for it not to conflict anymore. It was specifically the following line that contained a bunch of different languages:

export LANGUAGE=en:fr:es:de

I replaced the series of language codes with the same value as the other lines, en_GB.UTF-8 in my case:

export LANGUAGE=en_GB.UTF-8

Save the script, and restart your computer. You should be good!

Hopefully this saves a few people some pain!

More on languages: this AskUbuntu question.

 

Get the right locale for Evolution

27 Apr

An issue that has been bugging me for a while is that Evolution (3.10.4) somehow has the French locale even though most of my system is in British English (I use KXStudio 14.04, with the default KDE 4.13.3). Changing the locale and language preferences in the system settings wouldn’t help at all. That might have had to do with me playing around with settings and languages and software versions a lot, but there you go: I am not sure how I got there, but I found a solution.

This Linux Mint Forum thread put me on the right track. It seems there is a mismatch between the Evolution version that is installed and the base language pack in use (i.e. the Evolution version for which the strings in language-pack-en-base are written).

Here are the steps to get the extra file you need to change the language in evolution. (In my case, I wanted the en_GB locale, but you can replace it with whatever you want; you can also replace the version numbers with the corresponding Evolution version you have installed on your system.)


wget "https://download.gnome.org/sources/evolution/3.8/evolution-3.10.4.tar.xz"
tar -Jxvf evolution-3.10.4.tar.xz evolution-3.10.4/po/en_GB.po
msgfmt -cv -o ./evolution-3.10.mo ./evolution-3.10.4/po/en_GB.po
rm -rf evolution-3.10.4

This will extract and copy the right locale file into your /usr/share/locale-langpack/en/LC_MESSAGES/ folder. Close and open Evolution, and you should have the menus in the right locale. (Keep in mind that some email folders will still be in the original language if they were created that way in the first place!)

[Quickfix] FreeFileSync on Ubuntu 14.04 (and derivatives)

27 Oct

FreeFileSync is a great piece of software for making copies of your files.

However, even though Ubuntu 14.04 won’t see its end of life before 2019 (!), FreeFileSync 7 already “requires” to have 15.04 at least.

When trying to run FFS 7 on an Ubuntu 14.04-based distro, you might see the following error (when running in a terminal):

/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6: version `GLIBCXX_3.4.20'

You can still make it work by first making sure that you have libstdc++6 installed, and by adding a new PPA as follows:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-r/test

After updating and upgrading your packages, you should be right. You can check if you have GLIBCXX_3.4.20 with the following command

strings /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6 | grep GLIBCXX

Hope this helps!

[Tested on Kxstudio 14.04, with FFS 7.5. Info mostly from this AskUbuntu question.]