Tag Archives: Ubuntu 14.04

[Quickfix] FreeFileSync on Ubuntu 14.04 (and derivatives)

27 Oct

FreeFileSync is a great piece of software for making copies of your files.

However, even though Ubuntu 14.04 won’t see its end of life before 2019 (!), FreeFileSync 7 already “requires” to have 15.04 at least.

When trying to run FFS 7 on an Ubuntu 14.04-based distro, you might see the following error (when running in a terminal):

/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6: version `GLIBCXX_3.4.20'

You can still make it work by first making sure that you have libstdc++6 installed, and by adding a new PPA as follows:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-r/test

After updating and upgrading your packages, you should be right. You can check if you have GLIBCXX_3.4.20 with the following command

strings /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6 | grep GLIBCXX

Hope this helps!

[Tested on Kxstudio 14.04, with FFS 7.5. Info mostly from this AskUbuntu question.]

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Upgrade to LibreOffice 4.4 from PPA on an Ubuntu 14.04-based distro

6 Jul

[This post is based on an older one, but I thought it would be worth publishing an updated version.]

With version 4.4.4 of LibreOffice recently released, and the 4.3 branch having reached its end of life a while ago, you might want to upgrade your office suite. It is a good idea anyway, knowing that the 4.3 branch will not receive any more security updates officially delivered by The Document Foundation, and the 4.4 branch already integrates extra bug fixes. Plus, it comes packed with an array of exciting changes, including improvements to track changes (Writer), many toolbar improvements, better auto-correct, an enhanced statistics wizard (Calc), colour support in Math, new fonts, new import filters, improved OOXML support, new colour selector, better start centre, a few reworked drop-down menus, more intuitive context menus, and heaps more. Phew!

I have noticed in previous attempts that when I change the LibreOffice PPA I use, I end up still using the older version even though I have upgraded the packages.

Here is how to upgrade to a more recent branch properly.

You can find all the LibreOffice PPAs on this page. In my example, we will upgrade from the 4.3 PPA to the 4.4 PPA, but you can easily replace the version numbers by the ones that suit you. Of course, if you were not using a PPA, just omit the first step.

You will first need to remove the old PPA. You can do that by using your corresponding GUI: for example, in stock Ubuntu, go into “Software and Updates” in your system settings and delete it in the “Other software” tab; in Kubuntu or KXStudio, got to the Muon Update Manager and navigate to “Advanced > Configure software sources” to find it. Another quicker option is to open the terminal straight away (ctrl + alt + T) and use the “–remove” flag, with the following command:

sudo add-apt-repository --remove ppa:libreoffice/libreoffice-4-3

You can now add the new PPA with the following command:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:libreoffice/libreoffice-4-4

Then you need to uninstall entirely LibreOffice with the following command:

sudo apt-get purge libreoffice*

Make sure you update the repository information now that you have a new PPA:

sudo apt-get update

And finish with installing LibreOffice:

sudo apt-get install libreoffice

And you should be right!

Upgrade LibreOffice from one PPA to another on Ubuntu

19 Nov

With version 4.3.4 of LibreOffice just released, and 4.2.7 reaching its end of life today, you might want to upgrade your office suite from the 4.2 “still” branch to the 4.3 “fresh” branch.  You might also be excited about the new features that the 4.3 branch brings along, including better format compatibility, printable comments (Writer), better pivot table layout and improved statistics wizard (Calc), 3D models (Impress), improved PDF import, neater GUI (including a brand new colour picker), plus lots more.

I have noticed in previous attempts that when I change the LibreOffice PPA I use, I end up still using the older version even though I have upgraded the packages.

I am writing down here the process that actually properly upgrade LibreOffice by using PPAs, especially because I know I will have forgotten how to do it next time I am upgrading.

You can find all the LibreOffice PPAs on this page. In my example, we will upgrade from the 4.2 PPA to the 4.3 PPA, but you can easily replace the version numbers by the ones that suit you.

You will first need to remove the old PPA, if you already had one. You can do that by going into “Software and Updates” in your system settings and deleting it in the “Other software” tab, or you can install the nifty package ‘ppa-purge’ by opening the terminal (ctrl + alt + T) and typing in ‘sudo apt-get install ppa-purge’, and then using the command ‘sudo ppa-purge ppa:libreoffice/libreoffice-4-2’.

You can now add the new PPA with the following command:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:libreoffice/libreoffice-4-3

Then you need to uninstall entirely LibreOffice with the following command:

sudo apt-get purge libreoffice*

Make sure you update the repository information now that you have a new PPA:

sudo apt-get update

And finish with installing LibreOffice:

sudo apt-get install libreoffice

And you should be right!

You can also do all this by copy-pasting one single command after you removed the old PPA:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:libreoffice/libreoffice-4-3 && sudo apt-get purge libreoffice* && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install libreoffice

Nota bene: At the time of writing, 4.3.4 for Trusty (14.04) is not in the 4.3 PPA yet. There always is a bit of lagging between the official release and the PPA upload, but lately the packaging team has been way more responsive than in the past.

Install Synapse on Ubuntu 14.04

30 Sep

Synapse is an amazing little tool that I now systematically install when I have a fresh version of Ubuntu on my computer. It allows the user to search very quickly for an app to launch, a file to open or even to search something on the Internet. I find it to be a lot faster than the Unity dash.

Synapse recognise the closest matching result even if you inadvertently mash the keyboard with your fat fingers.

Synapse recognise the closest matching result even if you inadvertently mash the keyboard with your fat fingers.

Synapse also lists other results that match your search. Just navigate through them with the keyboard arrows.

Synapse also lists other results that match your search. Just navigate through them with the keyboard arrows.

Many have noticed that Synapse was removed from the official repositories when they upgraded to 14.04. This has already been reported on Launchpad.

Thankfully, it is rather painless to find the right package. Some people have figured out that the Ubuntu 13.10 package (synapse version 0.2.10-2ubuntu3) works well on the latest LTS version of Ubuntu. I tested both 32 and 64 bits versions without any problem. Make sure you download the right .deb package at the bottom of this page according to your architecture: if you are not sure, got to “cog icon > about this computer” and pick amd64 if you see “64 bits”, or i386 if you see “32 bits” under “OS type”.

Make sure you tell synapse to “startup on login” in its preferences so you can invoke it any time with the keyboard shortcut “ctrl + space” (which you can modify if you want to). I also un-tick “show notification icon” as it is not very useful (and as the icon does not fit the grey style of the other indicators :) ).

Leave Dropbox, join SpiderOak

27 Jul SpiderOak client and integration

While you are waiting for your own little home server to install your OwnCloud, make sure you change from Dropbox to SpiderOak as your default cloud storage service.

There are heaps of cloud storage businesses to choose from at the moment, but they differentiate in many ways. Dropbox is renowned for security and privacy issues, including possible involvement with PRISM and access to your files for copyright checks and deduplication. The English-language Wikipedia article about Dropbox details several issues that arose in the last few years. In SpiderOak’s case, data deduplication also exists but the difference is that it does not happen across users.

Surprinsingly, SpiderOak has been around longer than Dropbox: they started in 2007, and Dropbox the next year. They stress that their service focuses on security and privacy, using the term “zero-knowledge” to tell us that they won’t know anything about our personal stuff, and they have had a recent surge in new users because of the recent NSA revelations and the subsequent efforts of various non-for-profits to promote privacy in particular, and digital rights in general. On the 25th of July, their newsletter titled “Edward Snowden’s effect on SpiderOak” aknowledged that and read:

[…]We are excited to have you part of SpiderOak’s ‘Zero-Knowledge’ community. As more and more people become aware of our approach to user privacy and its implications for our digital lives, we can’t help but feel we are creating more than a business. We are actually creating a movement.
As it turns out, many people were listening when Edward Snowden mentioned SpiderOak. As a result, we’re seeing the highest rate of signups in our history. This has caused a dramatic increase in server load and customer inquiries. It’s been all hands on deck, around the clock to deliver the kind of service and response we feel is appropriate for such an occasion. By way of managing expectation, we plan to be fully adjusted within the week. […]
SpiderOak client and integration

SpiderOak client and integration

Another great thing about SpiderOak is that they provide a feature-full native client for Linux, including for Debian-, Fedora- and Slackware-based distributions, for both 32 and 64-bit architectures. In my test with both Ubuntu 13.10 and 14.04 (64-bit), the client integrated nicely with an indicator and a default sync folder that comes up in Nautilus (called the “SpiderOak Hive”). To find the client, go to their download page. You can also find their various open-source coding efforts on their GitHub page.

Because we are all about options, you can find other alternatives to Dropbox on the AlternativeTo website.

By the way, SpiderOak have a referral system that allows us to expand the free 2 GB storage space to up to 10 GB when getting friends to join (one GB per referral). If you want an extra gig when you join, let me know in a PM, I still have a few available.